(File pix) A 76-year-old complainant, Azizah Muslim, is puzzled on how to clear herself from an Employees Provident Fund (EPF) blacklist after her identity was allegedly forged/ duplicated to set up a company years ago. EPA Photo

A 76-YEAR-OLD complainant, Azizah Muslim, is puzzled on how to clear herself from an Employees Provident Fund (EPF) blacklist after her identity was allegedly forged/ duplicated to set up a company years ago. 

Azizah claimed her identity had been forged by an unknown individual who had put her name down as a director of a company of which she had no knowledge.

Azizah claimed she learnt about her status duplication issue when she went to the immigration office last year to validate her passport. 

“I was never a director of any company whatsoever.  

“I was shocked when the immigration officer who attended to me told me that I had been blacklisted by EPF and was not allowed to leave the country,” Azizah added. 

The single mother claimed she had a meeting with an EPF officer over her complaint but was told to pay RM14,000 to clear her name. 

“After a lot of discussion and negotiation, the officer told me to pay RM5,000 to have my name cleared from the blacklist.

“I’m left in the lurch now,” she said, seeking a clarification from the department. 


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An Employees Provident Fund spokesman clarified that the department had invoked Section 39(1)(a) to bar errant employers from leaving the country following a default judgment passed by a Kuala Lumpur magistrate court on April 11, 2007 amounting to RM15,679  in dividend arrears and late payment. 

In its statement, EPF said the complainant has been named as one of the three directors of Dataran Ganda Sdn Bhd who had been ordered to settle the due but had yet to do so. 

According to EPF records, Azizah Muslim, as one of the three directors has been found to be liable for contribution payment for the material period.

“Based on an official Companies Commission of Malaysia (SSM)  search and lodgement made to SSM, the complainant was appointed to the company on Dec 10, 2001 and resigned on Nov 2, 2004. 

“Thus, she is liable to pay arrears of dividend and the late contribution as stated by the magistrate’s court in 2007,” the EFP statement sent via email read.

It added that Azizah filed an appeal with the EPF and following which, on July 17 2017, the Appeals Committee of the EPF’s Legal Department had reached the decision that Azizah was to pay RM1,884 (being one-third of the total dividend arrears totalling RM5,652) and RM2,249 (being one-third of the late payment charges totalling RM6,748).

The spokesman said the notice had been served and duly acknowledged by the complainant’s lawyer, Mohd Fadhli Yahya from Messrs Siddiq Azani & Co on in August  but to date there had been no further action initiated on the part of her legal counsel.   

The spokesman added that to ensure employers discharged their duties to employees by making timely contribution payments, EPF invoked Section 39(1)(a) to bar errant employers from leaving the country.

“This barring is part of EPF’s enforcement measure to safeguard the interests of members, in accordance with the provisions of the EPF Act 1991.”

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