Bukit Jalil Sports School (BJSS) coach Kwan Yoke Meng is not entirely disappointed with the overall performance on the Malaysian squad at the World Junior ChampionshipsOSMAN ADNAN

KUALA LUMPUR: Bukit Jalil Sports School (BJSS) coach Kwan Yoke Meng is not entirely disappointed with the overall performance on the Malaysian squad at the World Junior Championships that came to an end in Yogyakarta, Indonesia on Sunday.

Despite ending the campaign with no winner titles, Yoke Meng remains optimistic of bouncing back stronger.

In the end, Malaysia won two silver medals from the mixed team and boys' singles event (Leong Jun Hao), and one bronze medal through 2015 champion Goh Jin Wei in the girls' singles event.

When contacted, Yoke Meng said: "Firstly, we must accept the fact that we came really close to ending on a high note, but we fell short at the final moment.

"If we are to compare the squad this year to the one from the previous edition in Bilbao, Spain, we definitely had a stronger team then.

"However, our chance of winning at least two titles was better this year.

"It was disappointing that we did not take our chances in the mixed team final against China, because our mixed doubles pair (Man Wei Chong-Pearly Tan) had given us an advantage when they won the first point.

"Jun Hao and Jin Wei should have delivered two more points, but they didn't deliver when it mattered most.

"In the individual event, Jun Hao came so close to winning the title, but fell short because he was too eager to win. He played well, but he just couldn't handle the pressure.

"In the deciding game, Jun Hao just drained out. We must applaud his opponent (Kunlavut Vitidsarn of Thailand) for playing a very good match. He was fit and he was composed.

"I wouldn't say we had a bad outing, because our target was to reach two finals and we did it. It is just unfortunate that we could not finish with two gold medals," Yoke Meng added.

The last time Malaysia won the mixed team title and the boys' singles crown was back in 2011 in Taiwan.

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